Thursday, July 29, 2021

XXXIII Olympic Summer Games, Tokyo 2020 (Days 7-15)

 
1. China 15 gold, 7 silver, 9 bronze
2. Japan 15, 4, 6
3. United States 14, 14, 10
4. Australia 8, 2, 10
5. Great Britain 5, 7, 6
6. South Korea 4, 3, 5
7. France 3, 5, 3
8. Germany 3, 3, 7
9. Italy 2, 7, 10
10. Netherlands 2, 7, 4
11. Canada 2, 3, 5
12. Hungary 2, 1, 2
13. Slovenia 2, 1, 1
14. Croatia 2, 0, 1
15. Kosovo 2, 0, 0
16. Brazil 1, 3, 3
17. Switzerland 1, 3, 2
18. Romania 1, 3, 0
19. Chinese Taipei 1, 2, 3
T20. Czech Republic 1, 2, 1
T20. New Zealand 1, 2, 1
22. Georgia 1, 2, 0
23. Serbia 1, 1, 2
24. Austria 1, 1, 1
T25. Hong Kong 1, 1, 0
T25. Tunisia 1, 1, 0
T27. Estonia 1, 0, 1
T27. Ireland 1, 0, 1
T27. Uzbekistan 1, 0, 1
T30. Bermuda 1, 0, 0
T30. Ecuador 1, 0, 0
T30. Fiji 1, 0, 0
T30. Iran 1, 0, 0
T30. Latvia 1, 0, 0
T30. Norway 1, 0, 0
T30. Philippines 1, 0, 0
T30. Slovakia 1, 0, 0
T30. Thailand 1, 0, 0
39. Spain 0, 2, 1
40. South Africa 0, 2, 0
T41. Indonesia 0, 1, 2
T41. Mongolia 0, 1, 2
T43. Belgium 0, 1, 1
T43. Denmark 0, 1, 1
T45. Bulgaria 0, 1, 0
T45. Colombia 0, 1, 0
T45. India 0, 1, 0
T45. Jordan 0, 1, 0
T45. North Macadonia 0, 1, 0
T45. Poland 0, 1, 0
T45. Turkmenistan 0, 1, 0
T45. Venezuela 0, 1, 0
53. Ukraine 0, 0, 4
54. Kazakhstan 0, 0, 3
T55. Egypt 0, 0, 2
T55. Mexico 0, 0, 2
T55. Turkey 0, 0, 2
T58. Argentina 0, 0, 1
T58. Cuba 0, 0, 1
T58. Finland 0, 0, 1
T58. Israel 0, 0, 1
T58. Ivory Coast 0, 0, 1
T58. Kuwait 0, 0, 1
T58. Portugal 0, 0, 1
T58. San Marino 0, 0, 1

Also, they’ve given 28 medals to competitors from Russia, which actually cheated in Olympics that it hosted.

112 comments:

  1. In the quarterfinals of women’s soccer, Team USA and Netherlands are "level at 2-2" and on break before the second period of extra time on NBC Sports Network.

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  2. The Rio 2016 medalists in this event were Germany gold, Sweden silver and Canada bronze. Brazil placed fourth in the tournament.

    Germany failed to qualify for Tokyo 2020. So far in today’s quarterfinals, Canada beat Brazil on penalty kicks; Australia beat Great Britain, 4-3, and Sweden beat Japan, 3-1. Monday’s semifinals will pit Australia vs. Sweden and Canada and the winner of this game ...

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  3. It's the eighth U.S. goal of the tournament overturned for offsides. We're under review.

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  4. For most of the last 30 minutes of play, the Dutch appeared to be the more aggressive and energetic of these two teams, even though the NBC Sports Network told us that Team USA is the deeper, more rested unit. However, some ..

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  5. "This is getting beyond ridiculous," says the NBC Sports Network play-by-play person, before relenting that the call was correctly upheld.

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  6. Getting back to what I was saying, though, Team USA had at least a couple of heroic, game-saving individual defensive efforts in the first period of extra time.

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  7. This second extra time has felt much more "level."

    Down to the last 45 seconds of it ...

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  8. Nope. Still 2-2. Shootout coming ...

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  9. "We apologize for getting your Friday morning off to such a nerve-racking start."

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  10. So the Dutch have this player, Vivianne Miedema, who scored both of their goals in the 121 minutes before the penalty kicks. Wikipedia says, "Regularly cited as one of the greatest strikers in modern women's football, Miedema is the all-time leading scorer in the FA WSL and has scored more goals at the international level for the Netherlands than any other player, across both the women's and men's teams." So, the deal is that she's really great.

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  11. She got loose in the first extra time, only the ball between her and the U.S. goal-keeper, and you could hear the dread in the announcers' voices. "You can't let this happen," the play-by-play guy sighed, as she positioned for a shot.

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  12. But, at that point, Julie Ertz, 29, of Mesa, Arizona, slid from behind Miedema's feet and kicked the ball out of bounds wide left of the U.S. goal. That appeared to me to be the best play of the main part of the game that I saw.

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  13. So the Netherlands send Miedema out for the first penalty kick, and the NBC Sports Network announcers are recalling different choices Miedema has recently made on penalty kicks in terms of where she shot into the goal.

    This time, Miedema chooses low and to the goal-keeper's right, and the goal-keeper guessed right! Alyssa Naeher, a 33-year-old from Bridgeport, Connnecticut (BRIDGEPORT IN THE HOUSE!), dove to her right and smothered Miedema's shot.

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  14. Just as it had felt the Dutch clearly were about to win for about 30 minutes, and just as it had felt the confidence had balanced after Ertz's and a couple of other key defensive plays in the first extra time, now it felt Team USA was really about to prevail.

    "TEAM USA ON THE BRINK!" called the NBC Sports Network play-by-play person so boldly that it stopped me in my tracks (What about GoHeath's goofy "live-blogging jinx?" What if he's right, smart boy?) So I shut the heck up.

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  15. Team USA make.

    Netherlands make.

    Team USA make.

    Netherlands make.

    Team USA make.

    Netherlands miss!

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  16. So on comes Megan Rapinoe, 36, of Redding, California.

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  17. According to 538, the USA is now down 11 medals below expectations. But as I said at the beginning, 538's expectations were ludicrously high. They had the USA winning 129 medals, which was never going to happen.

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  18. Now I barely know anything about soccer--when I went to Google Megan Rapinoe, it took me a while to find her because I was actually searching for "Regan Mapinoe." But after Team USA's "shocking" opening pool loss to Sweden, I heard a lot about this team being "too old." The "shocking" I didn't understand, because I read that Sweden actually kept Team USA out of the medals at Rio 2016 and won silver itself, even though Team USA had more recently won 44 matches in a row. But the "too old" I get because all of the Dutch looked significantly younger and more care-free than the Americans; Miedema, for example, is 25 and looked like she could've run it back if no one had late supper reservations in Tokyo.

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  19. On the other hand, Russia has won 12 more medals than 538 expected. So much for the IOC's alleged crackdown on Russia.

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  20. I will say this: If I were Putin, and I were the dictator of Russia, we would have a great Olympic team, even if we had to cheat. And apparently Putin feels the same way.

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    1. I would not. Cheating is stupid and wrong.

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    2. I want Western to hoist a huge banner for its 1971 NCAA Final Four Appearance, and dare the NC2A to make them take it down.

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    3. You're just trying to keep me from working. I see what you're doing here.

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  21. Like I said, Rapinoe is 36. And she looks older, as you might expect of a person who has both spent a lot of time in the sun and been on the front lines of U.S. culture wars. All throughout the last half of this match, Rapinoe had appeared to be neither as accurate nor as fast as Team USA needed her to be to beat a plucky Dutch team, hungry for its first-ever Olympic medal and led by arguably the world's best offensive weapon.

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  22. Rapinoe sighed heavily and ran toward the ball. The Dutch goal-keeper guessed low and to her right; Rapinoe fired high and to her left. Team USA wins!

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  23. So now we’ll see what happens at 3 a.m. Central Monday. I hope Rapinoe, 36; Naeher, 33 (BRIDGEPORT IN THE HOUSE!); Ertz, 29, and the rest of Team USA went straight back to the athletes village and went to bed.

    There have been six Olympic women’s soccer tournaments. Team USA won gold at Atlanta 1996, silver at Sydney 2000 and then golds at Athens 2004, Beijing 2008 and London 2012. The Americans were shut out of the medals at Rio 2016 when Sweden and Canada won silver and bronze. It was the second straight bronze for Canada, Team USA's opponent in Monday's first Tokyo 2020 semifinal.

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  24. There are very few athletes who have the star quality of Rapinoe. She exudes charisma. I worry about all penalty kicks, but the two people I had confidence in where Alex Morgan and Rapinoe. I knew they would make theirs.

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  25. And now I'm turning off the Olympics for a while, because I have about a week's worth of work to do before 7 when the Sweating Marching Maroons close two weeks of band camp with a preview of their fall show for families and friends eating hamburgers on the Madisonville-North Hopkins High parking lot.

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  26. Oh, good. USA Network is replaying the women's soccer quarter, and the Golf Network is showing some not-Olympics tournament. I won't be so tempted.

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  27. Latest medal count from 538:

    1. United States: 41 medals (14,16,11): 11 fewer than expected
    2. China: 40 medals (18,10,12): 3 more than expected
    3. Russia: 34 (10,14,10): plus SEVENTEEN
    4. Japan: 28 (17,4,7): minus 12
    5. Great Britain: 24 (6,9,9): minus 2

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  28. Golf Channel is squeezing in a tape-delay broadcast of the second round of the men's golf tournament just a couple of hours before Round 3 tees off on Japan's Saturday morning. Xander Schauffele of San Diego, California, just bent in a tremendous eagle putt from third-and-long on the par-5 No. 14, and that moves him into the tie for second at 8-under for the tournament. Moments later, Masters-champion/No. 1 homeboy Hideki Matsuyama--playing in Team Japan's brilliant sky-blue trousers--birdied to get to 7-under. So, suddenly, it's gettin' hot in herre ...

    1. Carlos Ortiz, Mexico, -10 (through 15 holes)
    T2. Alex Noren, Sweden, -8 (18)
    T2. Mito Perriera, Chile, -8 (18)
    T2. Xander Schauffele, United States, -8 (15)
    T2. Sepp Straka, Austria -8 (18)
    T6. Jazz Janewattanonand, Thailand, -7 (18)
    T6. Shane Lowry, Ireland, -7 (18)
    T6. Hideki Matsuyama, Japan, -7 (I don't know)
    T6. Rory McIlroy, Ireland, -7 (14)

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  29. Schauffele now at 9-under through 17 ...

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  30. Yes, sir! 10-under for Schauffele! Tied for the lead ...

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  31. Matsuyama to 8-under, and the Golf Channel guys are getting excited.

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  32. Paul Casey of Great Britain to 7-under ...

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  33. Ortiz closes out his second round with a par save to stay at 10-under and tied for the lead.

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  34. But, no! Schauffele rolls in another long birdie putt on 18. He closes out a round of 63 to move to 11-under and solo lead!

    When McIlroy finished Round 2, he told Steve "Sandsie" Sands that the course doesn't take a particularly spectacular effort to get a very low score--but also not a particularly spectacular failure to result in a very high score.

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  35. And just after Schauffele finishes, the horn sounds as lightning stops play. Hot Matsuyama and Casey are stranded with two and one holes to go, respectively. So here’s where things stand going into Saturday at Kasumigaseki Country Club:

    1. Xander Schauffele, United States, -11
    2. Carlos Ortiz, Mexico, -10
    T3. Hideki Matsuyama, Japan, -8 (through 34 holes)
    T3. Alex Noren, Sweden, -8
    T3. Mito Pereira, Chile, -8
    T3. Sepp Straka, Austria, -8
    T7. Paul Casey, Great Britain, -7 (35)
    T7. Jazz Janewattananond, Thailand, -7
    T7. Shane Lowry, Ireland, -7
    T7. Rory McIlory, Ireland, -7

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  36. Live play is scheduled to resume on Golf Channel at 5:45 p.m. Central. But I'm afraid Sandsie and friends will be facing a ratings washout in Madisonville, given that everyone here then will be queuing in concession-stand lines at MNHHS for hamburgers before the Marching Maroons' preview show at 7.

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  37. Well, I don't know what happened in the third round or most of the fourth. I know Rory Sabbatini won silver, and I know someone for Team USA won gold--got to be Xander Schauffele, right?

    We're in what started out as a seven-player playoff for bronze on tape delay on Golf Channel. Two were eliminated when the seven played the 18th, and now we have these five walking off the tee for lengthy birdie tries on the par-3 10th:

    -- Rory McIlroy, Ireland
    -- Collin Morikawa, United States
    -- Sebastian Munoz, Colombia
    -- C.T. Pan, Chinese Taipei
    -- Mito Perreira, Chile

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    1. Oh, failed to note that the two who failed to par the first playoff hole for bronze were Great Britain's Paul Casey and Japan's Hideki Matsuyama.

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  38. Thank you, Golf Channel, for suspending the scroll and not spoiling the result for us tape-delayers.

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  39. Munoz short ... Morikawa short ... McIlroy short ... Pan just short! ... Perreira ...?

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  40. A bit right.

    OK, Pan and Perriera were close enough that they putted out, so now the pressure's on to make pars ...

    McIlory ... good ...

    Morikawa ... good ...

    Munoz ... good ...

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  41. On to the 461-yard, par-4 11th ...

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  42. After the tee shots, it's Morikawa up first. I think he was the only one who did not play driver off the tee. One hundred sixty yards away ... OH, MY! ... he's inches from the cup!

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  43. Golf Network notes that Morikawa is the PGA Tour's best iron player of the last couple of years.

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  44. Munoz, out of a bunker, bounces to off the green behind the flag.

    Pan spins back to only a few inches further from the cup than Morikawa.

    Perreira is right on line for the flag, but he touches down short of the flag and then rolls backward to about five feet away.

    McIlroy lands pretty far to the right and back of the green but uses a ridge and rolls back to within about 10 feet of the hole.

    Hard to see Morikawa and Pan, at least, not birdie-ing here ...

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  45. Munoz rolls past the cup.

    Oh, Perriera is farther from the hole than I thought, and McIlroy is closer. Perriera is up first ... loops from right to left around the back of the cup and out!

    McIlroy ...

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  46. His putt is about six feet ... lips off just right!

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  47. Munoz is still out, and now he lips off his par try.

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  48. It's back to the 18th for Pan and Morikawa and the bronze.

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  49. This hole is 500 yards and bends right. Pan's tee shot goes to the left and comes to rest pretty deep in the rough, and his second shot is a good bit off the green behind and to the left of the hole. Morikawa's tee leaves 190 yards to the green, and his second shot from the first cut of rough--"GO! GO! GO!"--thuds into the rise of a bunker on the front of the green.

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  50. Pan's third will be longer; Morikawa's harder.

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  51. "Oh, dear," sighs someone on Golf Channel, as Pan's shot ambles to about six or eight feet from the hole.

    Morikawa ball emerges from a cloud of sand to just pop out of the trap and bounce onto the green. He has a very long par putt to go, which he pulls to the left and four or five feet beyond the hole.

    Pan, for bronze ...

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  52. Xander Schauffele of San Diego, California, wins gold; Rory Sabbatini, a South African for Slovakia, silver, and Pan Cheng-tsung of Miaoli County, Taiwan, bronze. Olympics golf rocks.

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  53. Here's the latest from 538:

    1. United States: 59 medals (20,23,16): 15 fewer than expected
    2. China: 51 medals (24,14,13): Exactly as expected
    3. Russia: 44 (12,19,13): PLUS TWENTY
    4. Great Britain: 32 (10,10,12): minus 4
    5. Japan: 31 (17,5,9): minus 17

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  54. Now that the swimming is finished, we can start analyzing how we did. Here were the totals for the USA and Australia in 2016:

    1. USA: 33 swimming medals (16,8,9)
    2. AUS: 10 swimming medals (3,4,3)

    No other country had more than 7 medals.

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  55. Here's how we did this year:

    1. USA: 30 swimming medals (11,10,9)
    2. AUS: 20 swimming medals (9,3,8)

    No other country had more than 8 medals. Australia did very well at these Olympics -- much better than they did five years ago. And they certainly cost us some gold medals. But our total medal count is quite similar to where we were in 2016, indicating that Australia's medals came primarily at the expense of other countries.

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  56. As we said five years ago, the 2016 Olympics team for the United States was extraordinary. It was probably the best team in my lifetime. Look at these medal counts for the USA since the Cold War ended:

    1992: 108 (37 gold)
    1996: 101 (44 gold)
    2000: 93 (37 gold)
    2004: 101 (36 gold)
    2008: 112 (36 gold)
    2012: 104 (46 gold)
    2016: 121 (46 gold)

    This year's team is not likely to match our 2016 totals -- it appears to be on pace for a more typical performance of just over 100 medals. That's not so much a criticism of this year's team as an example of how great the 2016 team was.

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  57. This is helpful, GoHeath--thank you.

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    1. About 30 more total "medal sets" are being divvied out at these Olympics than the 2012 and 2016 Summer Games.

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  58. It'll be bronze or nothing for Team USA in women's soccer. Canada won the semifinal early this morning, 1-0, on a penalty kick, after our phenomenal goal-keeper injured her knee.

    I didn't see it because I was up even earlier watching the Team USA fend off France to close out pool play undefeated in women's basketball.

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  59. OK, here are the current medals standings:

    1. China 29 gold, 17 silver, 16 bronze
    2. United States 22, 25, 17
    3. Japan 17, 6, 10
    4. Australia 14, 4, 15
    5. Great Britain 11, 12, 12
    6. France 6, 10, 17
    7. Germany 6, 6, 11
    8. South Korea 6, 4, 9
    9. Netherlands 5, 7, 6
    10. Italy 4, 9, 5
    11. New Zealand 4, 3, 4
    12. Czech Republic 4, 3, 1
    13. Canada 3, 4, 7
    14. Switzerland 3, 4, 5
    15. Croatia 3, 2, 2
    16. Chinese Taipei 2, 4, 4
    17. Brazil 2, 3, 5
    18. Cuba 2, 3, 3
    19. Hungary 2, 2, 2
    20. Denmark 2, 1, 2
    21. Slovenia 2, 1, 1
    22. Ecuador 2, 1, 0
    23. Greece 2, 0, 1
    T24. Kosovo 2, 0, 0
    T24. Qatar 2, 0, 0
    26. Georgia 1, 4, 1
    27. Spain 1, 3, 3
    T28. Romania 1, 3, 0
    T28. Sweden 1, 3, 0
    T28. Venezuela 1, 3, 0
    T31. Hong Kong 1, 2, 0
    T31. Slovakia 1, 2, 0
    T31. South Africa 1, 2, 0
    T34. Austria 1, 1, 3
    T34. Indonesia 1, 1, 3
    T34. Serbia 1, 1, 3
    37. Jamaica 1, 1, 2
    T38. Belgium 1, 1, 1
    T38. Ethiopia 1, 1, 1
    T38. Norway 1, 1, 1
    T41. Poland 1, 1, 0
    T41. Tunisia 1, 1, 0
    43. Turkey 1, 0, 4
    T44. Ireland 1, 0, 2
    T44. Israel 1, 0, 2
    T46. Belarus 1, 0, 1
    T46. Estonia 1, 0, 1
    T46. Fiji 1, 0, 1
    T46. Uzbekistan 1, 0, 1
    T50. Bermuda 1, 0, 0
    T50. Iran 1, 0, 0
    T50. Latvia 1, 0, 0
    T50. Morocco 1, 0, 0
    T50. Philippines 1, 0, 0
    T50. Puerto Rico 1, 0, 0
    T50. Thailand 1, 0, 0
    T57. Colombia 0, 2, 1
    T57. Dominican Republic 0, 2, 1
    59. Ukraine 0, 1, 5
    60. Mongolia 0, 1, 2
    T61. India 0, 1, 1
    T61. Kenya 0, 1, 1
    T61. Portugal 0, 1, 1
    T61. San Marino 0, 1, 1
    T61. Uganda 0, 1, 1
    T66. Bulgaria 0, 1, 0
    T66. Jordan 0, 1, 0
    T66. North Macedonia 0, 1, 0
    T66. Turkmenistan 0, 1, 0
    T70. Kazakhstan 0, 0, 3
    T70. Mexico 0, 0, 3
    T72. Azerbaijan 0, 0, 2
    T72. Egypt 0, 0, 2
    T74. Argentina 0, 0, 1
    T74. Armenia 0, 0, 1
    T74. Finland 0, 0, 1
    T74. Ivory Coast 0, 0, 1
    T74. Kuwait 0, 0, 1
    T74. Malaysia 0, 0, 1

    Also, athletes from Russia have received 50 medals. Russia had an Olympics, and it cheated!

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  60. So that's 79 countries so far to have won medals in these Summer Games. Eighty-six different countries won medals at Rio 2016; 85, at London 2012, and 86, at Beijing 2008.

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  61. The United States men's soccer team won the CONCACAF Gold Cup last night, beating Mexico 1-0.

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  62. Latest from 538, although it's increasingly clear that their model has significant flaws:

    1. United States: 64 medals (22,25,17): 18 below expectations
    2. China: 62 medals (29,17,16): 5 above expectations
    3. Russia: 50 (12,21,17): plus 22
    4. Great Britain: 35 (11,12,12): minus 5
    5. Japan: 33 (17,6,10): minus 19

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    1. When the Olympics are over, I'm looking forward to reading 538's explanation as to why it was overly optimistic about the U.S. and Japan, and overly pessimistic about China and Russia.

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  63. Latest from 538:

    1. United States: 73 medals (24,28,21): 17 below expectations
    2. China: 69 medals (32,21,16): 6 above expectations
    3. Russia: 52 (13,21,18): plus 20
    4. Great Britain: 43 (13,17,13): minus 3
    5. Japan: 36 (19,6,11): minus 20

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  64. Latest from 538:

    1. United States: 79 medals (25,31,23): 19 below expectations
    2. China: 70 medals (32,22,16): 4 above expectations
    3. Russia: 53 (14,21,18): plus 17
    4. Great Britain: 48 (15,18,15): minus 1
    5. Japan: 40 (21,7,12): minus 19

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  65. The Americans won 12 medals yesterday, including four golds. They also did better than expected. I'm pretty sure that's the best day we've had. Here's the latest from 538:

    1. United States: 91 medals (29,35,27): 14 medals below expectations
    2. China: 74 medals (34,24,16): 2 medals above expectations
    3. Russia: 58 (16,22,20): plus 18
    4. Great Britain: 51 (16,18,17): minus 3
    5. Japan: 46 (22,10,14): minus 17

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  66. Well, Japan beat Team USA in the baseball final, 2-0.

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  67. Japan got a run early before I woke up along about the fifth inning. Then the Americans kept getting guys on base, but Japan just kept getting out of jams. Then Japan got an insurance run in the bottom of the eighth, getting a runner home just ahead of a tag try at the plate, and that was pretty much that. As my favorite Yokohama DeNA BayStar and main man from Conyers, Georgia, Tyler Austin, who had two hits in this game and hit about .400 in this tournament, told NBC after the game, “That’s baseball."

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  68. In the early 1990s in Bowling Green, I played a lot of Nintendo Little League Baseball, and Japan was really good in that. Throughout today's game, I kept thinking how Yodoya, Hirano and some of those guys could've been sage veterans on the Japanese roster. I was happy for them.

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  69. This commercial where the guy keeps taking selfies in the dark is the breakout commercial of these Olympics for my household.

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  70. So that concluded the baseball/softball competition at Tokyo 2020 in 2021. The medal winners were Japan gold, United States silver and Dominican Republic bronze in baseball and Japan gold, United States silver and Canada bronze in softball.

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  71. So, I’ve rethought the Event-Balanced Olympics Points (E-BOP) again, and I decided that a team should get points if it participates in a sport. I don’t know how to write this out as a formula, but here’s how I’m figuring it now ...

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  72. France just won the men's indoor volleyball gold. That was excellent--my maternal home boys won the first two sets, lost the second two and then had to come back to win the fifth. It was the first men's indoor volleyball gold for France. Hurrah! Argentina won bronze.

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  73. Here's how I'll figure it this Olympics:

    -- Score 10 for each gold within an event, 5 for each silver, 3 for each bronze and 1 for participation without a medal (maybe even for the Russians in this case; I've got to think about that one).

    -- Add up the total number of points awarded to all teams.

    -- Divide a team's total points by the event's total points and then multiply by 100.

    -- Round up team totals to the nearest whole.

    -- Total up the team totals, and, if it's 99, give the 100th E-BOP to the top-scoring team.

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  74. So here are the final E-BOPs for baseball/softball:

    1. Japan 49 E-BOPs
    2. United States 24
    T3. Canada 7
    T3. Dominican Republic 7
    5. Mexico 5
    T6. Australia 2
    T6. Israel 2
    T6. Italy 2
    T6. South Korea 2

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  75. Per the main Olympics.com site, there are 47 "Olympic Sports:"

    1. 3x3 Basketball
    2. Archery
    3. Artistic Gymnastics
    4. Artistic Swimming
    5. Athletics
    6. Badminton
    7. Baseball/
    8. Softball
    9. Basketball
    10. Beach Volleyball
    11. Boxing
    12. Canoe Slalom
    13. Canoe Sprint
    14. Cycling BMX Freestyle
    15. Cycling BMX Racing
    16. Cycling Mountain Bike
    17. Cycling Road
    18. Cycling Track
    19. Diving
    20. Equestrian
    21. Fencing
    22. Football
    23. Golf
    24. Handball
    25. Hockey
    26. Judo
    27. Karate
    28. Marathon Swimming
    29. Modern Pentathlon
    30. Rhythmic Gymnastics
    31. Rowing
    32. Rugby
    33. Sailing
    34. Shooting
    35. Skateboarding
    36. Sport Climbing
    37. Surfing
    38. Swimming
    39. Table Tennis
    40. Taekwondo
    41. Tennis
    42. Trampoline Gymnastics
    43. Triathlon
    44. Volleyball
    45. Water Polo
    46. Weightlifting
    47. Wrestling

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  76. I don't like that list. Way too much cycling and gymnastics granularity, compared with, say, athletics.

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  77. I think I like the Wikipedia list better:

    1. Aquatics
    Artistic swimming (2)
    Diving (8)
    Marathon swimming (2)
    Swimming (35)
    Water polo (2)
    2. Archery (5)
    3. Athletics (48)
    4. Badminton (5)
    5. Baseball
    Baseball (1)
    Softball (1)
    6. Basketball
    (5x5) Basketball (2)
    3×3 basketball (2)
    7. Boxing (13)
    8. Canoeing
    Slalom (4)
    Sprint (12)
    9. Cycling
    BMX freestyle (2)
    BMX racing (2)
    Mountain biking (2)
    Road cycling (4)
    Track cycling (12)
    10. Equestrian
    Dressage (2)
    Eventing (2)
    Jumping (2)
    11. Fencing (12)
    12. Field hockey (2)
    13. Football (2)
    14. Golf (2)
    15. Gymnastics
    Artistic (14)
    Rhythmic (2)
    Trampoline (2)
    16. Handball (2)
    17. Judo (15)
    18. Karate
    Kata (2)
    Kumite (6)
    19. Modern pentathlon (2)
    20. Rowing (14)
    21. Rugby sevens (2)
    22. Sailing (10)
    23. Shooting (15)
    24. Skateboarding (4)
    25. Sport climbing (2)
    26. Surfing (2)
    27. Table tennis (5)
    28. Taekwondo (8)
    29. Tennis (5)
    30. Triathlon (3)
    31. Volleyball
    (Indoor) Volleyball (2)
    Beach volleyball (2)
    32. Weightlifting (14)
    33. Wrestling
    Freestyle (12)
    Greco-Roman (6)

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  78. Nyah, I disagree with myself again. I'm not going to give E-BOPs for participation. Too complicated--just thought about it relative to big individual events.

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  79. Here's how I'm now figuring it this Olympics:

    -- Score 10 for each gold within an event, 5 for each silver and 3 for each bronze (except medals given to Russia, which cheated at its own Olympics).

    -- Add up the total number of points awarded to all teams.

    -- Divide a team's total points by the event's total points and then multiply by 100.

    -- Round up team totals to the nearest whole.

    -- Total up the team totals, and, if it's 99, give the 100th E-BOP to the top-scoring team.

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  80. Revised baseball/softball E-BOPs:

    1. Japan 56 E-BOPs
    2. United States 28
    T3. Canada 8
    T3. Dominican Republic 8

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  81. But back to the sports list, I guess I will go with the 47 listed at Olympics.com, because they're the ones who get the official pictograms.

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  82. 3x3 basketball final E-BOPs:

    T1. Latvia 38
    T1. United States 38
    T3. China 12
    T3. Serbia 12

    This was the first Olympics for this sport.

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  83. Archery final:

    1. South Korea 50 E-BOPs
    2. Turkey 12
    3. Italy 10
    4. Japan 8
    T5. Chinese Taipei 6
    T5. Netherlands 6
    T7. Germany 4
    T7. Mexico 4

    The last time South Korea did not win this sport was Los Angeles 1984.

    Shut out at Tokyo 2020, Team USA won a silver and bronze in this sport at Rio 2016 and silver at London 2012.

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  84. Artistic gymnastics final:

    1. China 25 E-BOPs
    2. United States 18
    3. Japan 15
    4. Brazil 7
    T5. Great Britain 6
    T5. South Korea 6
    T7. Israel 5
    T7. Belgium 5
    T9. Chinese Taipei 2
    T9. Croatia 2
    T9. Germany 2
    T9. Italy 2
    T9. Spain 2
    T14. Greece 1
    T14. Armenia 1
    T14. Turkey 1

    What has happened to Team USA men’s gymnastics? Team USA won this sport at Rio 2016, typically finishes in the top one or two and has been powered by the women for some years. But this was the first time since Sydney 2000 that no American men medaled in artistic gymnastics.

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  85. Artistic swimming final:

    1. China 62 E-BOPs
    2. Ukraine 38

    See? This is where the Olympics.com list is really screwy Louie for an activity like this. There are only two medal sets in the whole sport. Wikipedia lumps artistic swimming with diving, marathon swimming, swimming (which I think should be called “swim racing”) and water polo under a single “aquatics” category. That’s not perfect but certainly better than artistic swimming’s getting its own pictogram.

    Well, whatever, I’m happy for Ukraine.

    This must’ve been an unhappy result for the home team, as Japan was the bronze winner in both events at Rio 2016 but failed to tally at Tokyo 2020. The Russians for several years have been the big medal recipients in this sport and were again in Tokyo 2020. I’ll be happy to note their success if and when they go through the years of expense and trouble to prove conclusively that they did not cheat here. I’m willing to give them a fair shake, but, for me at least, after Sochi 2014, the burden of proof resides with the Russians.

    Team USA, by the way, hasn’t medaled in artisitic swimming since it was still being called “synchronized swimming” at Athens 2004. Before then, going all the way back to the sport's first Olympics appearance at Los Angeles 1984, Team USA was consistently among the strongest competitors. I wonder what happened there.

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  86. Badminton final:

    1. China 45 E-BOPs
    2. Chinese Taipei 18
    3. Indonesia 14
    4. Denmark 11
    T5. India 3
    T5. Japan 3
    T5. Malaysia 3
    T5. South Korea 3

    China has won the sport every Olympics since Sydney 2000. Team USA has never medaled. This would be a perfect sport for the Kentucky High School Athletic Association to start pushing heavily.

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