Wednesday, January 23, 2019

What's On TV Tonight (1973)?

Channel 12 at 7 Central tonight 1973:


Channel 3 at 8:


That leaves a half-hour gap between the two broadcasts, and rich 1973 me will probably use it to watch the videotape of last Friday's Partridge Family, which I missed.

42 comments:

  1. Ah, Walter's turning 50 on Maude.

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  2. I've seen probably a half-dozen episodes of Maude, and I remember probably one full minute of scenes from the show. And it turned out this was one of the episodes I had seen, and it had one of the scenes I remember watching.

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    1. Check that ... this is actually the Jan. 29, 1973, issue; it covers events through Jan. 22.

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  4. OK, timeout for the NBA game of the week ...

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  5. The two Bullets in this game, Elvin Hayes and Wes Unseld, look fantastic in their swoopy warmup suits.

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  6. These are considerably toned-down Bullets compared to the ones who lost the championship round of the 1971 playoffs to Milwaukee in four straight games. Earl Monroe now struts his stuff for the Knicks. Gone too is weary-kneed Gus Johnson, who is best remembered in Baltimore floating on high, his gold-starred incisor twinkling amid a shower of purportedly shatterproof glass as he razed yet another see-through backboard. Only Center Wes Unseld and Forward John Tresvant remain from that squad. Today the Bullets go with the likes of smooth Guard Phil Chenier, spunky Forward Mike Riordan, solid Unseld, silken Elvin Hayes, speedy rookie Kevin Porter and the shifty Clark.

    Although Baltimore has won three division championships and a conference title in the past four seasons, Shue has generally been overlooked when the NBA's best coaches are mentioned. But in recent weeks he has become the object of considerable admiration, not so much for his team's 18-5 record since Dec. 1 and a 4½-game lead in the Central Division as for the alacrity with which he disbanded one team, put together another and molded it into a cohesive unit. The old Bullets were a helter-skelter fast-break outfit, which even in their best season allowed 112 points a game and whose set offense consisted of four men going one-on-one while Unseld looked on. This year Baltimore is among the league's best defensive clubs, permitting fewer than 100 points in 23 of its games, and it runs a pattern offense as smoothly as it does the break.

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    1. Speaking of The Partridge Family, this episode I had on the ol' VCR was also one where I specifically remembered one of the gags--Keith asks a girl for a quarter so he can buy a taco. (It's funnier than I make it sound here.) This and my Maude experience make me wonder if I'm remembering back to watching TV with my family this actual week in 1973 when I was 4. As previously reported, the Dec. 31, 1972, AFC championship is the first football game I remember watching on TV. And now we might be bumping into the first days of TV sitcom watching I can remember, Jan. 19-23, 1973. I think I am now ready to declare, THIS IS THE DAWNING OF THE AGE OF ERIC!

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  8. Both Hayes and the man Baltimore traded to Houston for him, Jack Marin, made the East All-Star team.

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  9. The most impressive players to me in this game so far are both with the West: guard Nate Archibald and forward Sidney Wicks. I have a slew of basketball cards for both of these guys, and I could tell by their statistics and their All-Star appearances that they were both really good. But I really remember watching Archibald only late in his career, when he was with the Larry Bird Celtics, and I don't remember watching Wicks at all. Archibald is a quick-stepping magician with the ball, and Wicks is a high riser with all kinds of interesting shots from 10 feet or so--turnaround jumpers, banks highhighhigh off the glass, etc. It's fun to see both in their prime.

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  10. Ah, yes, I forgot the NBA used to do center jumps at the top of each quarter.

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  11. The West is starting to slip behind in this game. They are playing without Rick Barry, who is hurt, and Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, who was dismissed from the game after a massacre at a home he formerly owned at 16th and Juniper streets in Washington, D.C. The AP dispatch about the tragedy said eight people had been killed; I had never heard about this story.

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  12. In happier news, Chris Schenkel throws to Washington for a special address from President Nixon: An internationally supervised cease-fire will begin in Vietnam at 7 p.m. Eastern Saturday. American POWs throughout Indochina will be released and all U.S. forces will be withdrawn from South Vietnam within 60 days, he says. All conditions for "peace with honor" have been met.

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  13. Schenkel revels in the wonderful news with his color commentator, Bill Russell, and notes how much more lively the Chicago Stadium crowd seems since Nixon's cease-fire announcement was broadcast over inside.

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    1. "That's the best news that any of us could hope for," Russell says, "that this horrible war is over."

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  14. Saturday on ABC: bowling from Denver and then ABC's Wide World of Sports, including last night's George Foreman-Joe Frazier fight from Kingston, Jamaica (Foreman won) and a ski tournament from Vermont. The on-screen graphics and the way that Schenkel talked about it, it sounds like the bowling was a standalone broadcast not under the Wide World umbrella. I wonder how ABC figured out how to sort all of that.

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  15. Sunday on ABC: Knicks at Celtics.

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  16. Now the ABC sideline reporter has an interview from the sideline with Spencer Haywood of the West. Haywood says playing in the All-Star Game is "about the biggest thrill of the year for players like me whose team is in second-to-last place and some of the younger players who are in their first All-Star Game."

    I'll tell you what, Sidney Wicks is a heck of a passer, too. This broadcast is really challenging my 45-years-honed, unfounded opinions of Sidney Wicks.

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  17. After the game, ABC will be broadcasting a one-on-one competition between Jim Barnett and Elvin Hayes! Chris Schenkel hints that it was quite a closely contested affair, so I'm hopeful that's here on this YouTube video, too.

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  18. The Wednesday morning, Jan. 24, 1973 issue of The Messenger (“Serving Madisonville And Hopkins County In The Heart Of The Western Kentucky Coal Field;” “Madisonville Hopkins County ON THE MOVE!”) banners a headline, “Peace With Honor In Vietnam” and accentuates it with lines of star border tape along the top and bottom of the words. Under the banner, then, The Messenger has the AP report headlined, “‘The Longest War’ Will End Saturday,” plus a localized report by Joan Bryant.

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  19. “Area people are cautiously happy today following the peace announcement by President Nixon last night,” she writes. “Mixed emotions were sorted out by some in an attempt to relate their feelings about the agreement, the return of the fighting men and prisoners and the hope of lasting peace in Vietnam and elsewhere.” Then there are a bunch of quotes from local people.

    Stories like this where you get person-on-the-street reactions to some event are pretty easy and fun to gather, but I think getting the bracketing right—figuring out the first paragraph or two, telling enough of the story but not too much, sufficiently throwing a tarp over the topics and emotions covered in all of the quotes (that are probably still being gathered, by the way)—is really, really hard. Joan Bryant has done a perfect job here.

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  20. Everything you imagine someone saying about the Vietnam War in January 1973 is said by one of the local people: hopes and doubts for lasting peace in the region, gladness that some soldiers are coming home, sadness that many are not, concerns for the entire region and "who won the war?"

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